S. Ann Dunham’s Viewpoint – Village Smithes, Music and Performing Arts in Java

Economic anthropologist, S. Ann Dunham (1942-95) researched a village of blacksmiths called Kajar on the outskirts of Jogjakarta city in Indonesia, for 14 years between 1977-91. Based on extensive reserch and observations in her dissertation “Surviving against the Odds, Village Industry in Indonesia“, she notes the association between blacksmithing, music and performing arts in Java.

Blacksmiths in Java, including Kajar, not only produce agricultural tools but also gamelan instruments (traditional music instruments used in Java and Bali). Metalworkers make gamelan gongs and keys of brass and bronze. Gamelan makers export sets of these musical instruments abroad. The principal buyers are schools and educating institutions in Europe and the USA. Gamelan instruments in Java also play important role in society in addition to entertainment.
Ann and friends. tile project, Lombok Indonesia

Dunham describes the 4 roles that form the Javanese blacksmithing process. These are empu (master smith), panjak (hammer swinger),tukang ubub (bellows worker) ,and tukang kikir (filer). She points-out the connection between the names of blacksmithing roles and musicians and performing artists. The empu, for example, “orchestrates” the production of every tool in the same way that wayang kulit (leather puppets) puppeteer “orchestrates” a puppet performance.

A few panjak, according to Dunham, hit the iron blank alternately, setting up a 1-2 or 1-2-3 rhythm which sounds like music. She notes “the word ‘panjak’ in Javanese can also mean musician or performer, and this association is probably due to this rhythmic sound”, and further “when one enters a large blacksmithing village, this sound can be heard coming from all corners of the village” (Dunham 2009, original 1992).

From a sociological perspective, she interestingly describes a woman working at perapen(forge) as follows: “When women work astukang ubub they remain on the bellows platform, do not jump down, and do not participate in general conversation. They sit rather stiffly and adopt a peculiar masklike facial expression, from which all emotion and animation has been erased.”

suppressive expression - Javanese Traditional Mask

The description continues “… in an earlier monograph I compared this expression to that of a classical Javanese dancer, a pesinden(singar in gamelan ensemble) with a gamelan orchestra, or bride on display at a traditional wedding. It seems to be a protective expression, one adopted by women in an ‘exposed’ position subject to possible public misinterpretation. Women who work in blacksmithing may feel vulnerable to criticism because they have entered a male realm where traditionally they do not belong” (Sutoro,Dunham 1982).

Dunham took a picture of young girl who works as tukang ubub with a masklike facial expression. Due to copyright, I cannot post that picture which is a vivid example of this point. You can, however, see it in Dunham’s dissertation (p139).

It is interesting that Nancy I. Cooper notes waranggana (=pesinden) in her work. Waranggana, according to her, often suppress the signs of their embodied power in favor of men’s spiritual and social potency, in keeping with a highly valued ideology of social harmony shared by both (Cooper 2000, abstract).

gamelan maker

a gamelan maker, taking batik to attend ceremony

Some Asian communities have stronger demarcation lines between male and female roles and positions compared to what can be said to be Western norms. Consequently, if women step into or “invade” male territory, they may act humbly, with prudence and be moderate and restrained in their expression. Men, on the other hand, who step into female territory, may feel out of place, and are less flexible and tolerant with the majority of communities in Asia usually masculine. As a result, in such environments men and women interact respectfully at the border of each other’s territory in a process in which local communities develop grown and activate their own culture in a “push-pull way”.

To deepen the understanding of the interaction between music, performing arts and society, further study is needed on Embodied Communities, Dance Traditions and Change in Java, investigating how Javanese dance related to social values, religion, philosophy and other related fields.

bibliography:
Ann Dunham Sutoro,1982. “Women’s Work in Village Industries in Java.” Unpublished MS.
――――2009. Surviving against the Odds, Village Industry in Indonesia: Duke University Press. (original: 1992.Peasant blacksmithing in Indonesia, Surviving and Thriving against all Odds: University of Hawai’i.)
Cooper, Nancy I. 2000. Singing and Silences: Transformations of Power through Javanese Seduction Scenarios. American Ethnologist, volume 27, issue 3.
Hughes-Freeland, Felicia. 2008. Embodied Communities- Dance Traditions and Change in Java. Berghahn Books.

……………
(Japanese Version)

鍛冶職人と音楽・上演アート ジャワにおいて~人類学者S.アン・ダナムの視点

■米経済人類学者S.アン・ダナム(1942-95)は、インドネシアのジョクジャカルタ市郊外にある一つの鍛冶村落、カジャールを14年間にわたり調査した。彼女は労作の博士論文Surviving against the Odds, Village Industry in Indonesiaの中で、ジャワにおける鍛冶職人と音楽、上演アートの関連を特筆している。

カジャールを含むジャワの鍛冶職人らは、農機具だけでなくガムラン(ジャワとバリの伝統的楽器)も製作している。金工職人は真ちゅうと青銅を材料にガムランの鐘、鍵を作る。ガムランの製作者は現在、楽器一式を海外へ輸出しており、主な購入者は欧米の学校や教育機関だ。ジャワにおいて楽器は娯楽のためだけでなく、社会の重要な役割をも果たしている。

ダナムはジャワの鍛冶業について、4種類の仕事を記述。これらは▽エンプempu(鍛冶頭)▽パンジャックpanjak(ハンマーを振る「先手」)▽トゥカン・ウブブtukang ubub(ふいご役)▽トゥカン・キキールtukang kikir(やすり掛け役)、だ。彼女はこれら役割の名称と演奏家・上演芸術家との関連性を指摘している。例えば鍛冶頭は、ワヤン・クリットwayang kulit(革製人形)の人形師が上演を”総指揮”するのと同じように、あらゆる器具の製作を”総指揮”している。

ダナムによれば、ハンマーを振る先手(さきて)数人は音楽のように1、2、あるは1、2、3のリズムで交互に鉄材を打つ。ジャワ語の「パンジャック」には音楽家あるいは演奏家という意味もあり、おそらくこのリズム音と関係している。大きな鍛冶村落に一歩踏み入れれば、鉄材を打つ音が村の隅々から響きわたってくる(Dunham 2009)。

■興味深いのは、彼女はメンタルの面からプラペンperapen(鍛冶場)で働く女性を、以下のように記述している点だ。:―――女性がトゥカン・ウブブとして労働する場合、作業中はふいご台にとどまり、飛び降りたり男性との日常会話に参加したりすることはない。いくらかかしこまって座り、仮面のような特有の表情でおり、すべての感情と活気さを打ち消している。

記述はさらに続く。:―――筆者(ダナム自身)は初期の論文で、この表情とジャワの古典舞踊家、ガムラン楽団のプシンデンpesinden(伴唱者)、あるいは伝統的結婚式で着飾られた花嫁らの各表情とを対照させてみた。これは守りに入った保守的な表情にみえ、あたかも公衆からの誤解を招きかねない、”曝された”立場の女性がつくるものだ。鍛冶産業で労働する女性は、慣習的には彼女らに無縁な「男性の領域」に入るため、非難の的になると感じている(Sutoro, Dunham 1982)。

ダナムは、仮面のような特有の表情で’ふいご役’として作業している若い女性の写真を残している。コピーライトの都合上、事例としては最適なその写真を掲載することはできないが、彼女の書籍Survivingの139ページで、その写真を見ることができる。

■ハワイ大学のナンシーI.クーパーが論文で、ワランガナwaranggana(プシンデンのこと)に触れているのも興味深い。彼女によればワランガナはしばしば、彼女らの”力”を具現化する’振る舞い’を抑え、男性をたてる。それは、男女が共有する「社会調和」というイデオロギーを保つためである(Cooper 2000、概要)。

■アジアの共同体は、西洋よりは男女のテリトリーが明確と考えられる。ゆえに、もし女性が男性のテリトリーに足を踏み入れ、あるいは”侵入”した場合、女性たちは表情を控えめに慎み深く、謙虚に振る舞うだろう。逆に男性で女性のテリトリーに足を踏み入れた者は、気まずく感じ、横柄な態度を取ることはまずない。アジアの共同体が普通、男性優位社会にあるにもかかわらず―である。女性と男性はそれぞれのテリトリーの境界上で、敬意を持ちつつ相互に影響し合い、結果として “押しつ押されつの方法”で地域社会は自らの文化を発展・活性化させることができる。

音楽・上演芸能と社会との相互作用の理解を深化させることが不可欠であり、このためには、フリーランドの「体現化された社会、ジャワの舞踊伝統と変容」(社会価値と宗教、哲学などに関係したジャワ舞踊を論述)などの研究が今後も一層求められていくことだろう。

参考文献:
Ann Dunham Sutoro,1982. “Women’s Work in Village Industries in Java.” Unpublished MS.
――――2009. Surviving against the Odds, Village Industry in Indonesia: Duke University Press. (original: 1992.Peasant blacksmithing in Indonesia, Surviving and Thriving against all Odds: University of Hawai’i.)
Cooper, Nancy I. 2000. Singing and Silences: Transformations of Power through Javanese Seduction Scenarios. American Ethnologist, volume 27, issue 3.
Hughes-Freeland, Felicia. 2008. Embodied Communities- Dance Traditions and Change in Java. Berghahn Books.

About Yoshi Maeyama

Devotee of an anthropologist, S.Ann Dunham, translated her dissertation book "Surviving against the Odds - Village Industry in Indonesia" into Japanese. Graduate student in Gadjah Mada University. http://www.myspace.com/ammaeya/blog
This entry was posted in anthropology, art, music. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to S. Ann Dunham’s Viewpoint – Village Smithes, Music and Performing Arts in Java

  1. Pingback: S. Ann Dunham’s Viewpoint – Village Smithes, Music and Performing Arts in Java | Tsuyoshi-hotmのスペース

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s